SUNU JOURNAL FOUNDER/EDITOR AMY SALL AND PHOTOGRAPHER/ARTIST CARLOTTA KOHL ENCAPSULATE THE FORWARD-THINKING, UNCONVENTIONAL APPROACH THAT HAS DEFINED POMELLATO FOR 50 YEARS.

Amy and Carlotta were specifically selected for #PomellatoForWomen digital campaign because of their bold uniqueness, and the singular ways they confront the world. Celebrating diversity and womanhood, Pomellato promotes female individuality and self-acceptance, while rejecting any oppressive standard. Celebrating color and authenticity, the Pomellato digital campaign highlights Amy and Carlotta’s natural beauty with brilliant hues, light-play and contrasts. Mix-and-matching a variety of Pomellato’s most iconic jewels, their audacious colors and volumes become playful jewelry sculptures – veritable extensions of a woman’s individuality. Bold and sensual, Pomellato jewels were never intended as mere decoration, their jubilance defies jewelry convention.

A graduate from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Arts & Sciences, Amy Sall holds a master’s degree in Human Rights Studies and is the Founder and Editor of SUNU: Journal of African Affairs, Critical Thought + Aesthetics, a forthcoming online platform and print journal seeking to amplify the youth perspective on matters concerning Africa and the diaspora. Currently Amy Sall is a part-time lecturer in the Culture and Media Studies department of The New School University’s Eugene Lang College.

“Beauty is a symbiotic relationship of the internal and external. Feeling beautiful inside and being healthy in mind, body and spirit inform being beautiful on the outside.”

“I don’t believe in a ‘feminine leadership,’ I believe in strong, ethical leadership. I have learned to be firm in my convictions and ethics, and having this foundation gives me the courage to be myself.
It’s important for me to not have to sacrifice any of my interests, which is difficult in a world where we are conditioned to choose a box and stay in it. I refer to myself and the work I do as transdisciplinary; the different things I do and ideas I have are all in conversation with one another, so there is still a holistic element.
My life experiences thave shaped who I am today, but it all starts with being the first born to parents who immigrated to America from West Africa. I’ve worked hard to set the standard for my siblings and also honor my parents and their many sacrifices. I would say I owe my ambition to my parents.”

Born and bred New York City, Carlotta Kohl earned her BFA from the School of Visual Arts. Packed with a unique sense of style and artistic viewpoint, Kohl often works as an artist, photographer or model and is equally composed in front of or behind the lens.

“Beauty encompasses so, so many things, but I believe inward beauty is first on that list. Being virtuous and kind goes far beyond any state of physical ‘perfection.’ Authenticity is another important characteristic when defining beauty. When someone embraces their qualities and makes no excuses for who they are – I find that mesmerizingly beautiful.”

“My work comes from what I know best: my life, my experiences.  I make paintings with wax-traditionally known as encaustic painting. My work explores the many facets of the female experience and how it relates to me. I use an array of cotton candy colors and evocative text to create my interpretation of what it’s like growing up a woman in today’s world. I’m constantly inspired by color and form. I frequently reference nature, 70’s adult film posters, fabric prints, typography, and children’s books from the 50’s and film.
I love wearing jewelry. I love the physical feeling of wearing it and how it can outwardly express what I’m feeling inwardly. I have several pieces I wear every day. Without them I would feel physically unbalanced! My jewelry is all a collection of memories. They tell my story.
I try to be authentic and honest with everything that I do so that maybe there is a chance that I can resonate with someone who might share a similar story but has a harder time accepting themselves. It’s important to be yourself, because who else is going to be you?”

YOU HAVE SEEN ROSSANA ORLANDI BEFORE. PERHAPS NOT IN PERSON, MAYBE YOU’VE NOT EVEN GLIMPSED HER PICTURE OR HEARD HER NAME – BUT HER IMAGE, YES.

Her image is iconic. The glasses, round and unabashed; the hair, a crisp shade of whitish gray; the frame, diminutive but demanding. She is a person whose style has been replicated, copied and caricatured a million times over.

She is the effervescent fairy godmother of the Italian design world, inviting you back to her little paradise-in-the-city to confound, dazzle and amaze you. That paradise? Her gallery and shop, nestled in a side street around the corner from Milan’s famous Santa Maria delle Grazie. But, while the famous church may be a pilgrimage for the devotees of Da Vinci, Rossana Orlandi’s gallery is the temple of good taste.

Always in control, Orlandi takes charge of the styling for her photoshoot, fussing through a package of Pomellato jewellery to find an ideal accompaniment to the black velvet grapevine-printed Emilio Pucci jacket from LaDoubleJ she is wearing for the portrait. She stacks Nudo and Capri rings in purple and green on her slender fingers and drapes layers upon layers of chains around the collar of her black turtleneck – her typical uniform.

In Orlandi’s hands even the most delicate jewels are given ample consideration, studied for their weight and tone and mixed with the most exacting eye. This attention to detail and innate sense of style are hallmarks of her brand, which has become an avatar of the local design scene.

During the annual fair her gallery acts as the unofficial embassy of Milan, dispensing the sought after, but difficult to imitate, Milanese sensibility of eclecticism and sophistication to the cosmopolitan cabal that passes through her doors.Orlandi’s spazio is the polar opposite of the typical white-cube style of gallery. Set in a former tie factory – and featuring multiple gallery spaces, a design shop, massive terrace and a restaurant – the entire production can be described best as a bricolage.

As much an exhibition space as it is a living archive, layers of the building’s history pile one atop one another into an elevated feat of personality. Wooden teller’s cubicles salvaged from a bank back when the building was still a factory were left in place when they moved in. Each booth is the perfect size for one of the impeccably arranged mise en scene Orlandi creates to showcase the gallery’s new acquisitions.

One room is painted entirely in black, left that way following an exhibition by Tom Dixon and never reverted back to its prior state. Sketches in black felt tip marker don the walls of the ground floor corridor, many of them loving portraits of Orlandi herself by the designers she knows and champions. Upstairs in the shop, the original floor-to-ceiling drawers previously used for storing fabric still remain, some still containing their original wares.

The store itself is a hodge-podge of treasures: tin plates printed with images by Maurizio Cattelan and rubber soled shoes piled in baskets for 10 euros a piece compete for square footage with elegantly designed Nika Zupanc furniture and Rick Tegelaar chandeliers.“When I first stepped foot in the space, I just knew: that’s my place,” says Orlandi as she flits about the gallery, trailing a slipstream of cigarette smoke behind her. Though she originally visited the former factory hunting for a new family home, its second life as an exhibition space was immediately clear.

The first piece I bought was the Spun Light by Sebastian Wrong. It is amazing, the proportion, the shape, and the touch are fantastic.

And right now? The designer of the moment in Orlandi’s opinion is Nika Zupanc. Slovenian born and educated, her art deco inspired pieces are plays on proportion: sofas with spindly legs hold aloft puffed up pastel cushions, and a foldaway bed, which could be described as music-box-meets-high-security-safe, are scattered throughout the building. It seems that when the fairy godmother waves her wand in your direction, things happen.

After Orlandi picked up a few prototypes to show at Salone del Mobile, Zupanc was tipped by luxury furniture line Sé London to produce an entire collection, with more collaborations on the way.

So what’s next for the monarch of the mobile Putting some finishing touches on the plans for next year’s fair, organizing her satellite location in southern Italy’s ritzy vacation spot, Porto Cervo and, if the perfect spot presents itself, opening up a second location abroad in the near future.

Surrounded by a near-constant constellation of collaborators and assistants, with her phone ringing constantly, one gets the impression that the rumble of energy that surrounds her is a sign of exciting things to come. But the driving force behind it? “Design,” she purrs as she peers over a pair of vintage white marble sunglasses, “is irresistible”.

DESIGN IS IRRESISTIBLE

BEAUTY FOR US IS THE COMBINATION OF THESE ASPECTS OF UNIQUENESS AND CRAFTSMANSHIP, A BALANCED, HARMONIOUS CO-EXISTENCE OF SHAPE, COLOUR AND MATERIAL. BEAUTY FOR US IS THE EXPRESSION OF TIMELESS ELEGANCE.

Every day we work to combine the poetry, grace and uniqueness of craftsmanship with contemporary design, fashion and taste. Curiosity is what takes you towards new horizons and new discoveries. The discovery of a sophisticated, very old pictorial tradition dating back to when Marco Polo travelled the Silk Route promoting cultural and trade exchanges, made us want to bring it to the knowledge of the West. Our desire was to follow in his steps in the opposite direction and bring this ancient oriental figurative art into our homes.  The challenge was to create a first, second and then other collections in which these two sensibilities, western taste and oriental tradition, could co-exist. Time however has proved us right and today many feel the need to personalise their home or furnish a public space or even an office with gorgeous luxurious hand-painted wall coverings that make any home or workspace unique.

At a time when rooms were still minimal and no thought was given to decoration, we suggested decorating walls with spectacular wallpaper, going against the taste and trends of the moment.

MISHA STANDS FOR MILANO AND SHANGHAI, TWO CITIES THAT REPRESENT TWO VERY DIFFERENT WORLDS, TWO VERY DIFFERENT CULTURES.

Despite representing two very diverse cultures—the Catholic Cartesian West and the Taoist Confucian East—Milan and Shanghai are both proactive, dynamic, sophisticated, hard-working cities.

Living in each culture means coming up against different modus operandi and communication methods at times, but it also means uniting traditions, techniques and figurative models that complete and enrich each other. These two cultures exist side by side, the one complementing the other, in all Misha products.

Misha’s activity embraces both Italian and Chinese craftsmanship, and like any form of artisanship, both express creativity, transmission of knowhow and experience, strongly linked to the physical place and artistic tradition at their origin. The grace and poetry of the oriental figurative technique were for us a source of inspiration and, combined with taste, knowledge and pictorial Italian tradition, they represent our daily challenge in everything we produce. Attentive, continual collaboration between Italian artists and designers and Chinese craftsmen allows us to create constantly innovative projects and work on interesting new undertakings.

Jewels, just like decoration and design, are victims to fashion and time. We like to think that even jewels can express a timeless elegance that embraces tradition and contemporaneity. Like clothes, like the house we live in, a jewel reflects our personality; it is a way of externalising our inner self and of completing what we wear. A jewel is the detail that makes us stand out, that makes us “feel at home”, “feel ourselves”. It is what makes every day different and reflects our mood in a form of self-expression whatever the occasion or event.

A jewel also has sentimental value—it is a gift we wear every day, it is part of us and it is a personal possession that expresses our link with traditions. So, wearing jewels means communicating our way of being and our mood, as well as our personal taste.

Today the line dividing art, fashion and design grows ever finer. On the one hand they share trends, colours and shapes, in the expression of change and shared research; on the other, each discipline senses its own limits and sees the possibility for new fields of expression through exploration of other disciplines. There is no distinction between art and fashion when fashion manages to produce objects that verge on the sublime, with such expression therefore, of the characteristics of research, beauty and perfection that they can be considered works of art.

Misha is an Italian brand that teams tradition and innovation in order to bring the excellence of ancient forms of craftsmanship into contemporary lifestyles. The entire range of Misha products—fine silk wallpaper, fabrics, embroidery and furnishing accessories—recuperate the beauty and uniqueness of art made by hand.

SILVIA: “MY JEWELLERY KEEPS ME COMPANY! I GIVE EACH PIECE A MEANING, AND THEY REMIND ME OF CERTAIN MOMENTS AND BRING ME LUCK. THEY BECOME AMULETS FILLED WITH MY ENERGY”.

When it came to beauty, the Greeks talked about “καλὸς κἀγαθός” or “beautiful and good”; they believed that the body’s outward appearance reflected the virtue of the mind, that those beautiful on the outside were beautiful on the inside too. I like to use this to spur me on to keep taking care of myself, both on the inside and the outside! Beauty means always being self-aware and never letting yourself go.

When I was pregnant with my son Giulio I wrote a list of the characteristics I wanted him to have: tall with abundant curly hair, passionate about sport, courageous and determined! Only now do I realise that courage and determination are learnt over time. I believe life always puts us to the test, encouraging us to exceed our limits and to reveal our courage and determination. Each person does this in their own style, with their own way of expressing themselves. Giulio doesn’t have curly hair.

I’ve worked in communications and PR for five years for the Grand Hotel et de Milan and the STRAF hotel&bar, both managed by an all-woman family! They taught me that taking care of guests and making them feel at home is always one of our objectives, and I think our feminine sensitivity helps us succeed in this!

I come from a beautiful provincial town, surrounded by nature. I’ve been living in Milan for many years now, and to begin with it represented work and toil, with no space for anything else. Now, however, it has become my city. I discovered it gradually, and now I feel like I know all its most beautiful and “secret” corners. I’ve seen it evolve rapidly; for several years now it has been a very international and dynamic city. Despite this, however, it is still people-friendly, and I live here just like I did in my provincial town, getting around by bike and buying bread every day from my favourite bakery!

 

BARBARA: “I BELIEVE THAT BEAUTY PLAYS A FUNDAMENTAL ROLE IN EVERYONE’S LIFE, MAKING BOTH LIFE AND PEOPLE BETTER: I THINK IT IS CONTAGIOUS”.

A world without beauty would not be a happy place; enjoying something in a beautiful place or seeing a beautiful object provides you with joy, magnifying positive feelings and bringing you happiness, which you then pass on to other people. I like things to be carefully honed and yet spontaneous in their simplicity. And I love searching for details whose precious nature is inherent in their making and in the (clear) concepts they comprise.

I’ve always tried to stick to two basic rules, which help me to tackle every day of my life: “never sit down, and always smile”. In other words, give yourself something to do, and stay positive. A small amount of recklessness is crucial to tackle every new project in life. I feel very fortunate to have a job I like and that I can treat as an interest, not as a chore.

I love jewellery when its making, design and form turn it into something precious, but I love it even more if it takes on meaning and so becomes unique. I therefore find it hard to be apart from some of my jewellery; I have a few pieces I am attached to emotionally and always wear, and a second selection of jewellery that I vary, focused more on aesthetics and fun and linked to the choices I make regarding my daily appearance. For me, the biggest difference between a piece of jewellery and any other design or fashion item, and therefore its strong point, is the intrinsic emotional meaning it can carry.

Milan has accelerated recently, becoming more international but retaining its restrained size. My work gives me the opportunity to travel a lot and visit the world’s biggest metropolises, but I always like being able to come back to a city like Milan, with its more manageable dimensions.

I believe very strongly in all forms of crossover: art, design, fashion, architecture, theatre and in general all art forms can exchange energy and ideas, evolving by taking on elements from different fields. I love going to museums and charitable foundations, such as Milan’s historic buildings like Villa Necchi Campiglio or the Boschi Di Stefano Museum-Home. I find them extremely feminine and familiar, places where you can discover your inner self.

 

MODERN BEAUTY CELEBRATES DISTINCTION, CHALLENGES IDEALS, AND ENCOURAGES INTERPRETATION.

At Assouline we bring our point of view to the pages of our books and share our vision of style and beauty, presenting what we find worthy of the attention of our readers.

I hope that the books inspire our readers to surround themselves with what they find beautiful—travel, food, flowers, art, wine, jewelry, fashion, cars, designed interiors, basically all the subjects of our books.

Jewelry adds style and signature as you can wear the same pieces over and over again, and each time you wear them they never lose their relevance and increasingly become a part of you. Style is repetition and the right jewelry transcends time.

I love wearing pieces with provenance and memory like a cocktail ring that belonged to my grandmother or something that was gifted to me or self-purchased in honor of a special occasion. Women should empower themselves as much as possible and buying and wearing jewelry is one great way to do that.

Illustrated books, much the same as fiction, are an entry to worlds we otherwise may never have had a chance to discover. It’s really a dream to be surrounded each day by the richness of our books and the work of the talented authors and photographers that are immersed in.

I read all of the proposals that are sent in to us, as you never know where you might find the unexpected or a hidden gem, and we have discovered many over the years.  I’d say working surrounded by books has kept me curious, open and filled with energy.

The distinctions between the feminine and masculine in the workplace are fading, I don’t see my feminine side come to play too much at work, so I am always glad to have the chance to express it with great jewelry!

Lucky for the next generation, heritage and innovation are not mutually exclusive. Some of the world’s greatest heritage brands are telling their stories in a way that is exciting, rich and digital simultaneously. As we are surrounded more and more by the digital, we will look towards books even more as objects to treasure and enjoy.

AUDREY BOSSUYT IS A GALLERIST AND AN ART COLLECTOR. AUDREY AND HER PARTNER NORDINE ZIDOUN JOINED FORCES IN 2013 TO CREATE ZIDOUN & BOSSUYT, A CONTEMPORARY ART GALLERY IN LUXEMBOURG.

For me beauty is a good balance between contrast and harmony and when I am looking for a new inspiration, I need to perceive both feelings. My job is a unique combination of feminine intuition and a capacity to deeply empathize with the artists.

As an art dealer I am very passionate about all forms of art in general and I consider contemporary jewellery as masterpieces of art. I am generally more attracted by bold jewellery. Its weight is reassuring and conveys a true value of authenticity.

When a woman buys herself a piece of jewellery, she demonstrates her independence and gives recognition to herself.

I strongly believe in feminine leadership. The courage to be myself gives me a great sense of joy which fills my body and soul and helps me to fully embrace my femininity. The challenges and achievements of my past have shaped me into a more mature woman, who is in full possession of her means and aware of her strengths.

Milano and Pomellato represent a great sense of elegance, creativity, movement and economic vitality to me. Pomellato is forward thinking, which is something that resonates with my professional vision. As an art collector I have to constantly feel the trends and above all, anticipate them.

My vision of art is very close to fashion as both subjects require a sharp eye and the need to embrace the present time.